EVIDENCE OF NEED AND OUTCOMES

Evidence

Services for young people are amongst the most important in any community with youth workers, in many senses being the unsung heroes of these communities.

By building up relationships of trust and support with young people, helping them make their own decisions about their own lives, and developing their confidence and resilience, youth workers play invaluable roles in supporting young people.

Spending cuts have harmed young people and their prospects in a number of ways. Cuts in benefits have meant that many young people from poorer backgrounds have struggled, even when they are in work, with rising housing costs and reduced housing benefit combining to make it increasingly difficult for young people to get a decent start in their adult lives.

Child poverty can have lasting affects. There is strong evidence to suggest links between poverty and poor educational attainment, which in turn has an impact upon their employment and earnings capacity, the development of complicated health issues and even reduced life expectancy. [i]

NATIONALLY

are now living in poverty[ii]. Fiscal studies suggest that this figure will soar to a staggering 5.2 million over the next 5 years, which is 37% of all children. [iii]
aged 14 are self harming[iv]. Experts have put the behaviour down to a combination of pressure from school, austerity and gender expectations[v]
with mental health problems are not receiving treatment. [vi]
of young people feel embarrassed about mental illness. [vii]

YOUNG PEOPLE’S HAPPINESS IS AT ITS LOWEST SINCE 2010. [viii]

LOCALLY

  • live in poverty, including 11,700 children. With 30 wards in the county having higher child poverty rates than the national average. [ix]
Hospital admissions for under-18 alcohol consumption are higher than the national average in all districts except Eden; in Allerdale and Copeland. [x]
where the percentage of young people with mental health disorders is higher than the national average; Allerdale, Barrow, Carlisle and Copeland.[xii]

HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS  FOR SELF HARM AMONGST YOUNG PEOPLE IS SIGNIFICANTLY HIGHER THAN THE NATIONAL AVERAGE. [xi]

CUMBRIA’S PROPORTION OF FIXED TERM EXCLUSIONS FROM EDUCATION OWING TO ‘PERSISTENT DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR’ IS GREATER THAN THAT OF THE NATIONAL AVERAGE. [xiii]

Youth workers, through their skill and expertise, the wide range of activities they engage in and the deep and lasting relationships they are able to build with young people are in a unique position to support young people in all of these areas and many more: helping them find employment, achieve qualifications, gain confidence, avoid drug or alcohol abuse, remain healthy and play their part in society.

OUTCOMES

For the last two and a half years Young Cumbria has, in conjunction with our young people, used the Outcome Star to help track and record progress. This has proved to be a brilliant way for young people to identify their strengths and see their progress. It has also enabled them to recognise and address set backs and barriers and helped them to put in place strategies to move forward.

The young people we have supported over the last 12 months (June 2017 – June 2018) have worked hard to achieve some incredible and life changing outcomes;

98% reported an improvement in their mental and emotional well being.

98% demonstrated increased confidence in dealing with stress and adversity

638 young people are now aware of when and where to seek the relevant support if they require it.

324 young people engaged with new activities

183 young people moved into employment, training or education.

Over 90% have reduced crisis related behaviours and have demonstrated good decision making.

Over 90% have positive friends and others who provide consistent support in their lives

70 young people have undertaken work placements

28 business have contributed to the support programme

15 businesses have created new work experience offers for young people.

[i] Child Poverty Action Group website 2016

[ii] http://www.endchildpoverty.org.uk/4-million-children-now-living-in-poverty-in-the-uk/

[iii] Guardian online 1st January 2018.

[iv] Childrens Society, The Good Childhood Report, 2018

[v] Guardian online, 29th August 2018

[vi] Guardian online 20th Jan 2017 – 12 Statistics to get you thinking about mental health.

[vii] Guardian online 20th Jan 2017 – 12 Statistics to get you thinking about mental health.

[viii] Childrens Society, The Good Childhood Report, 2018

[ix] Cumbria Observatory – Child Poverty – May 2016

[x] Children and young people Emotional health and wellbeing in Cumbria: Joint strategic needs assessment 2014

[xi] Children and Families – Joint Strategic Needs Assessment 2015. .

[xii] Cumbria Observatory – Children and Young Peoples Profile.

[xiii] Children and Families – Joint Strategic Needs Assessment 2015.

[xiv] Children and Families – Joint Strategic Needs Assessment 2015.